Help for DREAMers – Deferred Action

Issues: Immigration

The United States Customs and Immigration Service (USCIS) is now accepting requests for Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (Form I-821D).  Those who qualify are young people who came to the United States as children, do not present a risk to national security or public safety, and meet other certain criteria.  I strongly believe that young undocumented people, brought to America as children through no fault of their own, deserve a future.  This web page is here to provide DREAMers with information and resources in case you or a loved one needs help.

If you ever have any questions, please know that you are always welcome to call my district office. You can reach my El Monte office at (626) 448 1271. My staff is ready to help eligible DREAMers and their families navigate this new process.

On this page:

What is deferred action?

Who qualifies for deferred action?

How can I learn more about deferred action?

Where can I get help?

Protect yourself from scams.

Deferred action application documents.

 

 

What is deferred action?  

In June 2012, the Obama Administration announced that certain young undocumented immigrants may be granted relief from deportation through “deferred action.”   Successful applicants are eligible for deportation relief for two years, which is subject to renewal, and they can also apply for an employment authorization.

These young people are commonly referred to as “DREAMers” because they would have been provided pathway to citizenship under the DREAM Act, which I strongly support.

I encourage you to click here to download a flier (PDF) from USCIS that provides a helpful overview of the deferred action process.

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Who qualifies for deferred action?

Several key criteria must be met to qualify for deferred action.  These include:

• Under age 16 at time of entry into the United States.

• You’ve had continuous residence in the United States for at least five years since June 15, 2012.

• Either currently in school, graduated from high school or obtained general education development certificate, or honorably discharged from the Armed Forces.

• Haven’t been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, or multiple misdemeanor offenses, and not otherwise a threat to national security or public safety.

• 30 years old or younger.

These are just the basics.  If you believe that you or a loved one meets these criteria, I encourage you to keep reading for further details on how to get help.

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How can I learn more about deferred action?

This is a new process and it’s only natural if you have more questions.  I recommend reviewing the following documents for further help:

• Click here to download the USCIS brochure on deferred action (PDF). 
This document provides a useful and succinct 2 page overview of the deferred action process and who may qualify.  I encourage you to read this document first to get more information.

• Click here to download USCIS Frequently Asked Questions (PDF). 
This document is more thorough.  If you still believe that you or a loved one may qualify, please read this for additional information.

Additionally, you can always get the latest on deferred action by visiting the USCIS web resource center at www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.

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Where can I get help?

First, always know that my district office staff is always here to help you in any way that it can by providing you with up-to-date information on deferred action.  Please call (626) 448-1271 for further help.  In addition, these organizations will provide assistance in filling out the application, reviewing your paperwork, and properly submitting your documents to USCIS:

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
http://www.chirla.org/
2533 W. Third Street, Suite 101
Los Angeles, CA 90057
Phone: 213-353-1333; 1-888-624-4752

Central American Resource Center
http://www.carecen-la.org/
2845 W. 7th Street
Los Angeles CA 90005
Hours: Monday thru Friday – 9am-5pm
Phone: 213-385-7800

Los Angeles County Bar Association
http://www.lacba.org/
1055 West 7th St. Suite 2700
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Hours: Monday thru Friday – 9am-12pm & 1pm-3pm
Phone: 213-485-1872

Public Council Law Center
http://www.publiccounsel.org/
610 South Ardmore Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Hours: Monday thru Friday – 9am-12:30pm & 1:30pm-5:15pm
Phone: 213-385-2977

El Rescate
http://www.elrescate.org
1501 West 8th St. Suite 100
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Hours: Monday thru Friday - 9am-5pm; Saturday - 10am-2pm
Phone: 213-387-3284 

Korean Resource Center
http://www.krcla.org
900 S. Crenshaw Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90019
Phone: 323-937-3718
 

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Protect yourself from scams.

Please be wary of notarios who are taking advantage of young people by charging a fee to submit forms to USCIS on their behalf.  Visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams for tips on filing forms, reporting scams and finding accredited legal services. Many local non-profits are planning to offer reduced fee or free services to eligible youth.

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Deferred action application documents.

Please use the following links to download the necessary instructions and applications for deferred action.

Deferred Action

• Instructions: Consideration of Deferred Action Childhood Arrivals.  Download the PDF at www.uscis.gov/USCIS/files/form/i-821dinstr.pdf

• Application: Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.  Download the PDF at www.uscis.gov/USCIS/files/form/i-821d.pdf
 

Employment Authorization 

 Instructions: Application for Employment Authorization (I-765).  Download the PDF at www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-765instr.pdf

 Application: Employment Authorization (I-765).  Download the PDF at www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-765.pdf

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